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Save the Butterflies

The Decline of Butterflies and How You Can Help


Mexico 2013. Thousands of dead monarch butterflies lie on the ground.

It's their overwintering site.

Climate change weakens the butterflies.

Pesticides attack them, too.

Without enough energy to survive the winter, they'll never return home again.


1 of 5 butterfly species are at risk of extinction.

Their biggest enemy are we, the humans.

Mosquito pesticides and harmful farming techniques damage the buttefly population.

And we people need space.

So we destroy the habitats of our favourite insects.

 

The Rockland Grass Skipper (Extinct)


A 50% increase in extinctions in South Florida led to his demise.

This is just one example for the whole world.

Species in Africa and India don't get the funding they need.

Money needs to be spent on funding butterfly parks and the preversation of their habitats.

Why Butterflies?

Butterflies continue to be a inspiration for mankind.

 

They are a source for creativity.

 

They make plants grow and are food sources for birds.

 

Butterflies keep the plant populations in balance.

 

"Butterflies are so beautiful because they can't be touched. If you touch them, they'll die.

 

They teach you about appreciating beauty. Without wanting to own it.

 

Let beauty be. Let it grow. Let it evolve. Just watch and enjoy the show."

- Salvador Dalí

How Will 10% of Every Jewelry Sale Help?

Help Us Reach These Milestones

$25 will buy 20 violet plants, providing food for Pearl-bordered Fritillary caterpillars.

 

$65 pays for a breeding enclosure so rare butterflies can be given a population boost.

 

$130 covers the cost of 11 elm trees, essential for White-letter Hairstreak butterflies.

 

$320 will provide a training workshop for up to 15 volunteers to support our work.

 

$510 buys a brushcutter to clear overgrown scrub on our reserves so butterflies can thrive.

 

$1300 pays for a hectare of coppiced woodland to be restored allowing butterflies to prosper.

$25 will buy 20 violet plants, providing food for Pearl-bordered Fritillary caterpillars.

 

$65 pays for a breeding enclosure so rare butterflies can be given a population boost.

 

$130 covers the cost of 11 elm trees, essential for White-letter Hairstreak butterflies.

 

$320 will provide a training workshop for up to 15 volunteers to support our work.

 

$510 buys a brushcutter to clear overgrown scrub on our reserves so butterflies can thrive.

 

$1300 pays for a hectare of coppiced woodland to be restored allowing butterflies to prosper.


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